Don’t fence me in

I called Dad for Father’s Day and ended up talking to Michele for 30 minutes of the 35-minute call because Dad can’t hear well.

I mentioned that Mary Greeley Medical Center is trying to get people who were born there, together on Aug. 7 for an attempt at a world record. I was born there because Dad was attending Iowa State University.

A view of Pammel Court, married housing area in Ames.

A view of Pammel Court, married housing area in Ames.

We lived in Pammel Court, which was the married housing area. At the time, it was mostly quonset huts, I believe. My earliest memory is like a fuzzy black and white photo. We’re in front of a quonset hut at night. There’s a light over the door. There are several people standing is sort of a circle (probably talking). Someone is holding me.

Michele reminded me of a story from that time period. I don’t remember this, but do remember being told about it.

I must have been 2 or 3 years old. It would have been spring or summer. Dad built a fence to keep me in the yard. A neighbor remarked that it wouldn’t hold me. Dad said, sure it will. And then I climbed right over it.

More about Pammel Court, with links to more pages with photos.

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Anna Sohl

While doing research last week, I came across marriage information for Anna M. Sohl and John J. Kruger.

I think that Anna Sohl is the daughter of Peter Sohl and Anna Rush – the same Anna Rush who married Herman Meyn.

Anna_Sohl_marriage_1888-copy

 

 

 

 

 

 

The marriage information gives us this:

Groom: John J. Kruger
Parents: Christian Kruger, None (?) Lorhalt (It looks like None and is indexed that way. Maybe pronounced Nona?).
Born in Germany (Holland was written in and crossed out), white, farmer, lived in Sioux County, Iowa.
Affadavit given by Henry Sohl.
Age: 24 or 34 (I’m not sure – it’s kind of scribbly).
Bride: Anna M. Sohl
Parents: Peter Sohl, Anna Rush
Born in Germany, white, lived in Sioux County, Iowa.
Age 24
Married at bridegroom’s residents on 9 Sep. 1888. Witnesses were Henry Sohl and JOhn Rohder.
Married by M. (or N.) Baetke, minister
License date: 12 Jul 1888
License returned: 20 Sept. 1888

When Herman Meyn died in 1879, the newspaper notice stated he was survived by four children. When Anna Meyn died in 1910, the newspaper notice stated she was survived by four children. But right after Herman died (7 Dec 1879), their son Johann died (17 Dec 1879), so he would be one of Herman’s surviving children but not one of Anna’s.

Anna was married to Peter Sohl before her marriage to Herman Meyn (according to her obituary). At the time she died, she had been living with her son Heinrich Sohl. It’s quite possible that she had another child with Peter Sohl, and that could be this Anna Sohl.

In the previous blog post, Diphtheria, I talk about the deaths of Herman and three kids: Katharina, Carl and Johann. The names of all of Herman’s and Anna’s children, and Peter’s and Anna’s children are still not all known.

 

Diptheria

In November and December of 1879, there was a diphtheria epidemic in Sioux County, Iowa.

Below is the U.S. Federal Census Mortality Schedule for Sioux County.

USFedCensusMortalitySchedules-1880-MEYN-Herman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Four members of the Herman Meyn family died in a brief period: Herman, Katie, Carl (Charles in the document) and Johan (John in the document).

c084_meyn_h_id473338

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The gravestone lists the dates of death of Herman and their three children who died of diptheria, and Anna, who died in 1910.

107007882

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A newspaper notice (above) mentions that Herman Meyn died of diphtheria, and he was the second member of his family to die from that disease.

The newspaper notice below only listed Herman and Katie. Third column from left, near the bottom. Under Sheridan (something that looks like Glab) Box. The notice states that he left a widow and four children. Johann died after Herman, so that leaves three.

108056029

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Evangelical Lutheran Church records all four funerals at the top of this page:

Evangelical-Lutheran-funerals

 

 

 

 

 

In the 1880 census, Anna Meyn is listed as a housekeeper with daughters Agusta, age 2, and Bertha, age 4.

1880-census-Meyne-Annie

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In 1900, Anna lived with her daughter Augusta and her family:

1900 census Anna Meyn

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anna never remarried. Her obituary on Dec. 3, 1910, states she was living with a son, Heinrich Sohl (this would be from her first marriage), and she was survived by four children. Heinrich Sohl, Augusta Meyn Burrell and possibly Bertha Meyn would be three. I don’t know who the fourth child was. The 1880 census is the only mention I have of Bertha Meyn, so I’m not sure if she was one of the surviving children. (Obit is at the top of the fifth column from the left, under Death Toll for a Week.)

Since the newspaper notice about Herman’s death states he left a widow and four children, but Johann died after Herman, that left three. Anna’s obit states she had four surviving children. I’m guessing that her son Heinrich (from her first marriage) was not one of the four mentioned by Herman’s notice.

158862441

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is not all that I have on this family, but I’m not clear on everything yet. Who is the other child of Herman and Anna Meyn? What happened to Bertha Meyn? Did Anna have any other children by her first marriage?

Thinking this over again, I remembered that Katie and Johann died after Herman. They may have been two of the four listed as surviving him (even though not by much). That would indicate that two of Anna’s surviving children were from her first marriage.

There is also a family story of Augusta’s sister (unknown if it was Bertha or another sister) being abducted by neighbors or gypsies.

 

Henry J. Korn

I found a new tidbit on Ancestry today. The obituary for Henry J. Korn (my great-grandfather), who died in October 1962.

KORN_Henry_J-obit-Oct-1962It lists survivors: his wife, Frieda, children Florence Burrell and Arthur Korn, his mother Anna Dengg, eight grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

That would be me.

Three of his grandchildren have died: Janice (my mom), Diane and Nancy, all children of Florence. As far as I know, Arthur’s children are still living, so I won’t mention them by name.

It’s always exciting to find these items, even if there is no new information. But it really makes a connection when you see yourself mentioned, however obliquely.

Source information:

Ancestry.com. Historical Newspapers, Birth, Marriage, & Death Announcements, 1851-2003 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.

The Chicago Tribune. Chicago, IL, USA: The Chicago Tribune, 1850-1985.

A few live ones

In the course of doing research on David Caylor and his family, I discovered that there are a few lively characters in our family tree.

David is the first son of Lydia Carr. She was married to a Caylor, but I don’t know if her husband’s name was David or John. I’ve seen both in various public trees. She married William Burrell and had William, Walter, Bertha, Blanche and Lulu. She divorced William for abandonment (I got this info from Jack Webb) and married John Baxter in 1895. She died in 1924 and John Baxter died in 1925. They are buried in Oakland Cemetery, Fort Dodge.

David was married twice. I think his first wife’s name was Sarah Catherine Hurley. There’s a Sarah C. on the Caylor stone at Oakland Cemetery, and when their daughter Lavona was married, Catherine Hurley was listed as the maiden name of the mother of the bride. David had died by then, so Lavona would have given the information.

David’s wife is mentioned (Mrs. Dave Caylor) in a couple of articles that make her sound rather excitable. Family Troubles in Court (she got into an argument with Mrs. John Grell in front of John Gill’s grocery store) and Women Terrorize an Officer. These incidents may be why David moved the family from Fort Dodge to Cherokee in May 1899, but the family was back in Fort Dodge in May 1900, when his wife died. Their son Ruel Seth died in April 1901.

(Side note: I just found a Ruel S. Hurley in the 1908 Fort Dodge city directory. Sarah Catherine’s father? That would mean that Ruel Caylor was named after his maternal grandfather. More research is needed. A Ruel Hurley left Fort Dodge in July 1901 to move to Poulsbo, Washington. Did they come back? Yes, apparently. Also, in 1890, a daughter was born and a dog was killed.)

Later in 1901, David was charged with being drunk and disorderly and fined $7.10.

David fought the city over property rights in 1906. His house was in an area that a railroad wanted, and he was one of a group of homeowners in the court case. The article mentions the Newton and Northwestern Railroad. I think it was later the Chicago Great Western, as that railroad had tracks along Central Avenue to 12th Street, where the depot stood. But David was still living there later that year when he remarried.

David remarried on Oct. 10, 1906, to Minnie Gentry. She had been married before and had a son, Roy. I don’t know whether she was divorced or widowed – more research is needed. They had a son Lloyd and a daughter Fay. Fay lived only 3 days.

In 1907, his house was struck by lightning. The article mentions that the house was struck by lightning two years previous, and that another house was struck by lightning – that of Walter Burrell. Walter is David’s half-brother, from Lydia Carr’s second marriage. What a coincidence.

David died in 1912 and some time before 1920, Minnie married John Paap. He had children from a previous marriage. The 1920 lists his three sons and Roy and Lloyd.

Lloyd Caylor had perfect attendance in the first semester of the 1921-22 school year.

Roy married Lillian Long in 1923 in Humboldt, Iowa. Her parents were Diamond Long and Rose Hodson. There are mentions in the Humboldt paper around 1925-26 of Roy and Diamond being charged with bootlegging and Roy charged with driving with no lights (probably related to the bootlegging).

The links are all from Fort Dodge newspapers that were digitized. I didn’t link the Humboldt newspaper articles because you have to sign in to read them, but I did download them.

I did several searches, including Ruel Caylor. I left off here: http://fortdodge.advantage-preservation.com/search/site/ruel%2520caylor?page=25. More research is needed.

This is just a bit of what I’ve found over several hours. I have attached some of the information to my tree on Family Search. I need to add it to Ancestry and probably WikiTree as well. So many ancestors, so little time!

Mrs. Baxter Dies

Fort Dodge Messenger & Chronicle
May 14, 1924, P. 14

DSCF4631

Mrs. Baxter Dies

Mrs. John Baxter, seventy-eight years of age, died at 4:00 o’clock yesterday afternoon at her home, 1202 South Twenty-second Street, after a lingering illness. She had been ill during the past few weeks with the flu previous to which she had suffered from cancer.

She is survived by her husband, two daughters and a son. They are Mrs. H.M. Webb, of Salem, Oregon; Mrs. O.W. Schoonmaker of Savage, Montana, and Walter Burrell of Fort Dodge. Twenty grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren also survive.

Mrs. Baxter was born in Pennsylvania and has been a resident of Fort Dodge for the past twenty-four years. The funeral will take place Thursday afternoon at 2:00 o’clock from the home and at 2:30 from the Epworth Methodist Church. The Rev. T.J. Pettit will have charge of the services. Burial will be made in Oakland cemetery.

http://fortdodge.advantage-preservation.com/document/fort-dodge-messenger-and-chronicle-1924-05-14-page-14

Photo taken 23 May 2015 at Oakland Cemetery.

Added some records

I recently purchased copies of a birth certificate, a marriage license and a death certificate.

0001

Birth certificate: Florence Korn
This shows her parents’ names. Her mother’s maiden name (Frieda Muhs) was indexed as Frieda Ninho. I can tell how the indexer made the mistake (really sloppy handwriting), but it’s still irritating.

Stanley Dengg-Anna Korn marriage

Marriage licence of Stanley Dengg to Anna Korn (widow of Jacob Korn) on 26 Jul 1941.

Marriage license: Stanley Dengg and Anna Korn
This shows the date and place of marriage, as well as the correct name of the groom. For some reason, I thought it was Anton. I don’t know where I got that from, but it does show that memories can be false (or vague … ). This is the wedding that my mom attended when she was about 3. She said it was the first time she got drunk (I have no idea if there were many times, I only know about this one). She went around drinking beer out of the glasses that the adults left within reach. I’m sure they thought it was a hoot.

0003
Death certificate: Anna Korn
I was hoping to get her parents’ names from this, but unfortunately, they are not listed. The informant was her daughter-in-law, Frieda (Muhs) Korn. So I’ll have to find the information elsewhere.

Henry Muhs

Two things:

Henry Muhs in Illinois Death and Stillbirths, 1916-1947, died 8 Jan 1927 in Chicago, Cook, Illinois, United States. Lists father (Peter Muhs), mother (Kath … Stotenberg) names and birth place (Bosbik by Kiel, Germany), wife Hannah Muhs, occupation: painter, race: white, address 1432 Wolfram. FHL film number is 1877900 (anybody want to go look that up for me?).

1920 Census lists Henry and Hannah Muhs living at 1432 Wolfram in Chicago. He owned the building. Henry, Frieda and Florence Korn also lived in the building. Frieda is the daughter of Henry and Hannah Muhs.

New information:

Henry Muhs death date, father’s and mother’s names, birth place for all three, Henry’s occupation, 1920 place of residence, Henry Muhs owned the building and his daughter, son-in-law and granddaughter lived there. Henry Korn was a box maker. Henry Korn came to the U.S. in 1907. Henry and Hannah Korn came to the U.S. in 1887.

Google image of 1432 Wolfram:

Next step is to get all this information linked to my three trees on Ancestry, FamilySearch and WikiTree.

Note: Johanna Cornilsen married Heinrich Muhs. She apparently went by Hannah. I believe that she remarried after he died. The name of her second husband might be Anton Dengg, but I haven’t corroborated that. My mom (Janice Burrell Snyder) told that she got drunk when she was about 3 at her grandma’s wedding when guests left a little beer in the bottom of their glasses and little Janice went around finishing off the glasses.

The last of the Burrell girls

Arthur_2My Aunt Diane passed away in the night. She was the last living daughter of Arthur and Florence Burrell.

That means that I (their first grandchild) am now their oldest living descendant.

I have nothing profound to say. Just keep in touch with your family and write things down. Remember.

Heroes and villains

On my way to the library in Fort Dodge to volunteer at the Webster County Genealogical Society, I had this thought: everybody has heroes and villains in their family.

It’s so simple and true.

Some people try to hide the skeletons in the family closet, but I think we really shouldn’t do that. Maybe I would feel differently if it turned out that a close relative was high in the Nazi party or something along those lines, but I think we have to accept our family history.

In my family’s case, one known villain was a young man who in a heated moment made a really bad decision.

On Saturday, July 11, 1908, Will Carr was involved in a fight with a stranger near the train depot in Gowrie, Iowa, after drinking heavily that afternoon. Town Marshal Thomas Nicholson apparently broke up the fight or attempted to arrest Will Carr. Will (he’s sometimes referred to as William or Wilbur) went home and got a gun, then went back to the depot, where he found the marshal and shot him.

There¬† are newspaper accounts of the incident and the subsequent trial. One of the articles mentions that Thomas Nicholson’s wife was the sister of Ira Carr’s wife. This Ira Carr was the brother of Will Carr. This was confirmed in a book called “The Biographical Record of Webster County, Iowa” which was published by the S.J. Clarke Publishing Company in 1902.

That book  lists the children of Richard Quick, including Bessie, married to Thomas Nicholson, a farmer of Roland township, and Leona, married to Ira Carr, also a farmer of Roland township. Roland township is north of Gowrie.

I’m sure that time eases the impact of these events. Had this occurred within my lifetime I would probably not be so easy with it. But we are the sum of everything that has happened before us. It shapes our families and it shapes our selves. We can embrace the good and try to learn from the bad, but it doesn’t help to hide it away.