Author Archives: CaySedai

Don’t fence me in

I called Dad for Father’s Day and ended up talking to Michele for 30 minutes of the 35-minute call because Dad can’t hear well. I mentioned that Mary Greeley Medical Center is trying to get people who were born there, together on Aug. 7 for an attempt at a world record. I was born there because Dad was attending Iowa State University. We lived in Pammel Court, which was the married housing area. At the time, it was mostly quonset […]

Anna Sohl

While doing research last week, I came across marriage information for Anna M. Sohl and John J. Kruger. I think that Anna Sohl is the daughter of Peter Sohl and Anna Rush – the same Anna Rush who married Herman Meyn.             The marriage information gives us this: Groom: John J. Kruger Parents: Christian Kruger, None (?) Lorhalt (It looks like None and is indexed that way. Maybe pronounced Nona?). Born in Germany (Holland was […]


In November and December of 1879, there was a diphtheria epidemic in Sioux County, Iowa. Below is the U.S. Federal Census Mortality Schedule for Sioux County.                 Four members of the Herman Meyn family died in a brief period: Herman, Katie, Carl (Charles in the document) and Johan (John in the document).                 The gravestone lists the dates of death of Herman and their three children […]

Henry J. Korn

I found a new tidbit on Ancestry today. The obituary for Henry J. Korn (my great-grandfather), who died in October 1962. It lists survivors: his wife, Frieda, children Florence Burrell and Arthur Korn, his mother Anna Dengg, eight grandchildren and one great-grandchild. That would be me. Three of his grandchildren have died: Janice (my mom), Diane and Nancy, all children of Florence. As far as I know, Arthur’s children are still living, so I won’t mention them by name. It’s […]

A few live ones

In the course of doing research on David Caylor and his family, I discovered that there are a few lively characters in our family tree. David is the first son of Lydia Carr. She was married to a Caylor, but I don’t know if her husband’s name was David or John. I’ve seen both in various public trees. She married William Burrell and had William, Walter, Bertha, Blanche and Lulu. She divorced William for abandonment (I got this info from […]

Mrs. Baxter Dies

Fort Dodge Messenger & Chronicle May 14, 1924, P. 14 Mrs. Baxter Dies Mrs. John Baxter, seventy-eight years of age, died at 4:00 o’clock yesterday afternoon at her home, 1202 South Twenty-second Street, after a lingering illness. She had been ill during the past few weeks with the flu previous to which she had suffered from cancer. She is survived by her husband, two daughters and a son. They are Mrs. H.M. Webb, of Salem, Oregon; Mrs. O.W. Schoonmaker of […]

Added some records

I recently purchased copies of a birth certificate, a marriage license and a death certificate. Birth certificate: Florence Korn This shows her parents’ names. Her mother’s maiden name (Frieda Muhs) was indexed as Frieda Ninho. I can tell how the indexer made the mistake (really sloppy handwriting), but it’s still irritating. Marriage license: Stanley Dengg and Anna Korn This shows the date and place of marriage, as well as the correct name of the groom. For some reason, I thought […]

Henry Muhs

Two things: Henry Muhs in Illinois Death and Stillbirths, 1916-1947, died 8 Jan 1927 in Chicago, Cook, Illinois, United States. Lists father (Peter Muhs), mother (Kath … Stotenberg) names and birth place (Bosbik by Kiel, Germany), wife Hannah Muhs, occupation: painter, race: white, address 1432 Wolfram. FHL film number is 1877900 (anybody want to go look that up for me?). 1920 Census lists Henry and Hannah Muhs living at 1432 Wolfram in Chicago. He owned the building. Henry, Frieda and […]

The last of the Burrell girls

My Aunt Diane passed away in the night. She was the last living daughter of Arthur and Florence Burrell. That means that I (their first grandchild) am now their oldest living descendant. I have nothing profound to say. Just keep in touch with your family and write things down. Remember.

Heroes and villains

On my way to the library in Fort Dodge to volunteer at the Webster County Genealogical Society, I had this thought: everybody has heroes and villains in their family. It’s so simple and true. Some people try to hide the skeletons in the family closet, but I think we really shouldn’t do that. Maybe I would feel differently if it turned out that a close relative was high in the Nazi party or something along those lines, but I think […]